Google’s Secret OS May Replace Android Leaked Video | Google Fuchsia OS

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Google Fuchsia OS is a capability-based, operating system currently being developed by Google. It first becomes known to the public when the project appeared on GitHub in August 2016 without any official announcement.

Google-Fuschia-Operating-System

Fuchsia works precisely the same no matter how big a screen is, and we finally have a working version that you can download on a Pixelbook right now.

Google Fuchsia OS May Replace Android Leaked Video

Fuchsia is based on a new microkernel called “Zircon”, derived from “Little Kernel”, a small operating system intended for embedded systems, which was developed by Travis Geiselbrecht. Upon inspection, media outlets noted that the code posted on GitHub suggested Fuchsia’s capability to run on universal devices, from embedded systems to smartphones, tablets and personal computers.

In May 2017, Fuchsia was updated with a user interface, along with a developer writing that the project was not a “dumping ground of a dead thing”, prompting media speculation about Google’s intentions with the operating system, including the possibility of it replacing Android.

Google Fuchsia Release Date

There is no official release date of Google Fuchsia but there is a possible chance that Google’s new Fuchsia OS can release this year.

Google Fuchsia Operating system

Fuchsia’s user interface and apps are written with “Flutter”, a software development kit allowing cross-platform development abilities for Fuchsia, Android and iOS.

Flutter produces apps based on Dart, offering apps with high performance that run at 120 frames per second. Flutter also offers a Vulkan-based graphics rendering engine called “Escher”, with specific support for “Volumetric soft shadows”, an element that Ars Technica wrote “seems custom-built to run Google’s shadow-heavy “Material Design” interface guidelines”.

Due to the Flutter software development kit offering cross-platform opportunities, users are able to install parts of Fuchsia on Android devices. Ars Technica noted that, while users could test Fuchsia, nothing “works”, adding that “it’s all a bunch of placeholder interfaces that don’t do anything”, though finding multiple similarities between Fuchsia’s interface and Android, including a Recent Apps screen, a Settings menu, and a split-screen view for viewing multiple apps at once.

 

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